Medical Dictionary     Orthodontics Definition    Send this page


  Free Full Text References 18 Dec 2014


Free Full Text ArticleSurface roughness of a dental ceramic after polishing with different vehicles...
Related Articles

Surface roughness of a dental ceramic after polishing with different vehicles and diamond pastes.

Braz Dent J. 2006;17(3):191-4

Authors: Camacho GB, Vinha D, Panzeri H, Nonaka T, Gonçalves M

During fabrication of bonded ceramic restorations, cervical adaptation, occlusal adjustment and final finishing/polishing are procedures to be performed at the dental office after adhesive cementation. Final adjustments may result in loss of ceramic glaze, which requires new polishing of the ceramic surface, with special attention for selection of adequate materials and instruments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of different vehicles associated with diamond pastes indicated for dental ceramic polishing. Two polishing pastes (Crystar Paste and Diamond Excell) associated with four vehicles (rubber cup, Robinson bristle brush, felt wheel and buff disc) were evaluated. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from Ceramco II dental ceramic. Surface roughness means (Ra) of the ceramic specimens were determined with a rugosimeter. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. There was no statistically significant difference (p>0.01) between the polishing pastes. However, there were statistically significant differences (p<0.01) among the tested vehicles. Vehicle-paste interaction showed statistically significant difference (p<0.05) as well. It may be concluded that: 1) Robinson bristle brush, felt wheel and buff disc were efficient vehicles to be used in association with a diamond polishing paste; 2) The use of rubber cup as a vehicle showed poor efficiency for mechanical polishing of the ceramic surfaces; 3) Both pastes provided similar and efficient polishing and may be recommended for use with an appropriated vehicle.

PMID: 17262123 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleOcclusion, TMDs, and dental education.
Related Articles

Occlusion, TMDs, and dental education.

Head Face Med. 2007;3:1

Authors: Ash MM

The paradigmatic shift to evidence-based dentistry (EBD) that relates to occlusal therapy, selective occlusal adjustment (OA) and stabilization splints therapy (SS) for TMDs has had an unfavourable impact on the teaching of many of the important aspects of occlusion needed in dental practice. The teaching of OA systematically in dental schools has been nearly abandoned because of the belief that OA is an irreversible procedure and gives the impression that it is without merit elsewhere in the management of occlusion. However, a particular dose of knowledge and practice of occlusion that is necessary for all aspects of dental care should be taught systematically in dental schools. The uses and misuses of OA and SS and their limitations should be emphasized because of their importance to bring clinical reality into the dental curriculum. Thus, and irrespective of EBD induced contradictions, OA and SS should still have a significant place in systematically teaching of occlusal therapy. However, there are many more aspects of the management of occlusion that should to be considered. Hopefully, because of their importance, other aspects of the management of occlusion will once again become a significant part of the dental curriculum.

PMID: 17201917 [PubMed]


Free Full Text ArticleIs there an association between occlusion and periodontal destruction?: Only ...
Related Articles

Is there an association between occlusion and periodontal destruction?: Only in limited circumstances does occlusal force contribute to periodontal disease progression.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2006 Oct;137(10):1381, 1383, 1385 passim

Authors: Deas DE, Mealey BL

PMID: 17012717 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleInfluences of palatal side design and finishing on the wearability and retent...
Related Articles

Influences of palatal side design and finishing on the wearability and retention of mouthguards.

Br J Sports Med. 2006 Dec;40(12):1006-8

Authors: Maeda Y, Machi H, Tsugawa T

OBJECTIVES: To examine the influences of design and finishing on mouthguard wearability and retention. Materials and METHODS: 17 students at the Dental Technician Institute at Osaka University School of Dentistry, Osaka, Japan, participated in this study after providing informed consent. For each student, a single-layer custom-made mouthguard was fabricated from a 3.8-mm-thick ethylene-vinyl acetate sheet using a standardised procedure to obtain a precise fit. Each mouthguard was modified by changing the margin location and shape through five consecutive steps. At each step, questionnaires with a visual analogue scale regarding wearability (comfort, breathing, speaking, swallowing, lip closure, temporomandibular joint fatigue and swallowing) and retention were completed by subjects after wearing the mouthguard for 5 min. Statistical analyses were carried out among the steps using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test with a significance level of p<0.05. RESULTS: Significant improvements were found for comfort, breathing, speaking and swallowing by trimming the palatal margin to the cervical area, smooth finishing and occlusal adjustment of the mouthguard (p<0.01). No significant differences were found for retention throughout the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of this experimental study, design and finishing at the palatal side appear to have significant influences on mouthguard wearability, but not retention.

PMID: 17000712 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleDirect technique for the fabrication of acrylic provisional restorations.
Related Articles

Direct technique for the fabrication of acrylic provisional restorations.

J Contemp Dent Pract. 2006 Feb 15;7(1):157-73

Authors: Schwedhelm ER

Provisional restorations are fabricated to protect the prepared tooth structure during the period between tooth preparation and insertion of the definitive restoration. These restorations are also referred to in the literature as interim, temporary, or provisional restorations (prostheses). Such restorations should be uncomplicated and inexpensive to fabricate in a short period of time. Several laboratory and clinical techniques for the fabrication of provisional restorations have been described in the literature, such as the indirect technique, direct technique, and indirect-direct techniques for both single and multiple unit restorations. This article describes a step by step clinical technique for the fabrication of a direct provisional restoration to satisfy the issues of esthetics, patient comfort, speech and function, maintenance of periodontal health, and maxillomandibular relationships while wearing the restoration.

PMID: 16491159 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text Article[The clinical results of combined periodontal-orthodontic treatment on patien...
Related Articles

[The clinical results of combined periodontal-orthodontic treatment on patients with periodontitis and labial displacement of incisors]

Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue. 2005 Aug;14(4):431-3

Authors: Zhu BL, Guo YH, Zhou HA, Fu XH

PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical effects of combined periodontal and orthodontic method in treating labial displacement of anterior teeth caused by periodontitis. METHODS: 21 cases with periodontitis and fly-out of anterior teeth were selected. After the inflammation was controlled by essential periodontal therapy, the anterior teeth were allied by edgewise appliances; meanwhile, periodontal care and occlusal adjustment were conducted to control inflammation and occlusal trauma, until normal occlusion was established. A total of 74 teeth were treated, the periodontal probing depth and the degree of alveolar ridge resorption was recorded before and after treatment, respectively. All the data were statistically analyzed by Ridit test and Chi-square test. RESULTS: After 1-2 years of follow-up, all cases under 40 years got satisfactory effects, with significantly decreased periodontal probing depth (P<0.01) and alveolar ridge (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment was effective in the management of periodontitis, occlusal trauma and teeth alignment, and the effects were stable for a relatively long period. But patients over 40 years was not suitable for the treatment.

PMID: 16155714 [PubMed - in process]


Free Full Text Article'Observations' questioned.
Related Articles

'Observations' questioned.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul;136(7):856, 858; author reply 858

Authors: Greene CS, Klasser GD, Epstein JB

PMID: 16060466 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleMore about occlusion.
Related Articles

More about occlusion.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul;136(7):854, 856; author reply 856

Authors: Harrel SK

PMID: 16060465 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleOcclusal equilibration.
Related Articles

Occlusal equilibration.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul;136(7):850, 852; author reply 852, 854

Authors: Woods WD

PMID: 16060464 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text Article[The effects of occlusal adjustment on retention of dental wedge-shaped defect]
Related Articles

[The effects of occlusal adjustment on retention of dental wedge-shaped defect]

Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue. 2005 Jun;14(3):323-4

Authors: Zhu TJ

To observe the retention of filling material for dental wedge-shaped defects after occlusal adjustment, patients in the experimental group was given suitable occlusal adjustment before filling with glass ionomer cements or light-curing composite resin according to the patient's requirements. Evaluation was carried out by statistical analysis after one year. The results showed significant difference in the retention between the experimental group and the control group (P<0.01) after one year. It's concluded that suitable occlusal adjustment of the teeth with wedge-shaped defect is beneficial to the retention of filling material.

PMID: 15995787 [PubMed - in process]


Free Full Text ArticleNon-surgical treatment of Class III malocclusion in adults: two case reports.
Related Articles

Non-surgical treatment of Class III malocclusion in adults: two case reports.

J Orthod. 2005 Jun;32(2):89-97

Authors: Gelg&#xF6;r IE, Karaman AI

Class III malocclusions are usually growth-related discrepancies, which often become more severe until growth is complete. The surgery can be part of the treatment plan. The purpose of this report is to review the orthodontic treatment of two patients with a Class III malocclusion who were treated non-surgically. The basis for this treatment approach is presented and the final treatment result reviewed. Important factors to consider when establishing a Class III molar relationship are discussed.

PMID: 15994982 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleThe major part of dentistry you may be neglecting.

The major part of dentistry you may be neglecting.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Apr;136(4):497-9

Authors: Christensen GJ

Observation of occlusion, providing patient education about occlusion and treatment of occlusal conditions sadly are neglected in the profession. Occlusal equilibration is one of the major treatments for occlusally oriented diseases, and I estimate that this procedure is not accomplished frequently by many practitioners. I have discussed the conditions needing occlusal equilibration and suggested procedures for the conditions. I encourage practitioners needing education in occlusion to seek it.

PMID: 15884320 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleA clinical evaluation of the clinical remount procedure.
Related Articles

A clinical evaluation of the clinical remount procedure.

J Contemp Dent Pract. 2005 Feb 15;6(1):48-55

Authors: Al-Quran FA

One hundred patients were treated with complete dentures. The patients were divided into two equal groups; the first group (50 patients) received complete dentures and a clinical remount procedure was performed, while the second group received complete dentures without a clinical remount. A four point, nine scale Patient Denture Satisfaction questionnaire was used to evaluate the patients' satisfaction with their dentures. When the clinical remount procedure was used, results have shown a highly significant improvement in the comfort of the upper dentures and in the fit and comfort of the lower dentures. There was a significant improvement in the chewing ability as well. In conclusion it is highly recommended the clinical remount procedure be used because it improves the patient's satisfaction with their dentures in many important aspects as shown in this study.

PMID: 15719076 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleIs occlusion becoming more confusing? A plea for simplicity.
Related Articles

Is occlusion becoming more confusing? A plea for simplicity.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2004 Jun;135(6):767-8, 770

Authors: Christensen GJ

It is not difficult to observe and record patient occlusal characteristics before starting simple or complex occlusal rehabilitations. If this is done, and if the subsequently placed crowns and fixed prostheses are constructed in observation of similar characteristics, clinical success usually is the result. Deviations from the suggestion to duplicate the "normal" occlusion should be made when the original natural occlusion had caused overt pathosis, or when all teeth or one arch of the teeth is being restored at one time. If this is the case, centric relation occlusion is more reproducible and easier to develop than occlusion with a shift from centric relation to centric occlusion. Peculiar requests of patients relative to occlusal positioning, or routine dependence on various devices to predetermine occlusal characteristics for rehabilitation (as is currently popular in some groups), should be considered, but they should be tempered with careful observation of preoperative occlusal characteristics.

PMID: 15270161 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text Article[Treatment results of 216 cracked teeth: clinical analysis]
Related Articles

[Treatment results of 216 cracked teeth: clinical analysis]

Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue. 2004 Jun;13(3):236-7

Authors: Sun WM, Hu LR, Yan CP

PURPOSE: To evaluate the treatment results of 216 cracked teeth. METHODS: Between May 1991 and May 2003, 208 patients with 216 cracked teeth were treated according to the stages. The patients were followed up and the final outcomes were analyzed, retrospectively. RESULTS: The majority of the patients were between 40 and 60 years, with a predominance in males. The cracked lines were mainly located in the mesial grooves. The dominant treatment modality was binding of band, adjustment of occlusion, endodontic therapy and restoration with artificial crowns, with a success rate of 92%. CONCLUSION: Cracked teeth are commonly seen clinically with appropriate treatment, these teeth can be still useful. Routine extraction of these teeth are not advocated.

PMID: 15269872 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleThe EBD approach.
Related Articles

The EBD approach.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2004 May;135(5):560, 562; author reply 562, 564, 566

Authors: Simon J

PMID: 15202744 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text Article[Effect of removable partial denture(RDP) generated occlusal interference on ...
Related Articles

[Effect of removable partial denture(RDP) generated occlusal interference on masticatory efficiency-A preliminary study]

Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue. 1999 Jun;8(2):86-8

Authors: Ding L, Yang CY, Xu WJ

OBJECTIVE:This study was primarily aimed to observe the effect of RPD-generated occlusal interference on masticatory efficiency.METHODS:In this study,masticatory performances of thirty-six patients treated with removable partial dentures were assessed by peanut-light absorption test before and after occlusal adjustment was performed.Then comparing the differences of masticatory efficiency when occlusal interferences on dentures were present or eliminated.RESULTS:Patients who received occlusal adjustment made significant improvement in their masticatory efficiency (P<0.01). Occlusion appeared to do directly influence chewing ability.CONCLUSION:The results showed that occlusal factor is one of the major factors responsible for denture quality and health of stomatognathic system. Occlusal adjustment is important and necessary in dental prosthesis.

PMID: 15048277 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


Free Full Text ArticleMarginal peri-implantitis due to occlusal overload. A case report.
Related Articles

Marginal peri-implantitis due to occlusal overload. A case report.

Med Oral. 2004 Mar-Apr;9(2):160-2, 159-60

Authors: Uribe R, Pe&#xF1;arrocha M, Sanchis JM, García O

The etiology of marginal peri-implantitis describes an infectious factor and a biomechanical factor resulting from occlusal overload. Clinical and experimental articles oriented to the biomechanical factor are scarce, so as the studies about the histology associated to periimplantitis. We present a case of marginal peri-implantitis on an implant in the mandibular molar zone caused by occlusal overload, which led to an osseous defect on the marginal crest. The treatment was composed of occlusal adjustment, removal of contaminated surgical tissue, and autogenous bone graft, which varies from the common treatment of infectious peri-implantitis. Histologic analysis of peri-implantitis tissue reveals a juxtaepithelial lympho-plasmocytorious infiltrate and a central zone of dense fibro-connective tissue with scanty inflammatory cells, which differs from the chronic inflammatory tissue associated with infectious peri-implantitis. Clinical and radiographic followup control after 12 months evidenced the remission of the symptoms and bone regeneration on the marginal crest. We consider that in the treatment of marginal peri-implantitis, it is necessary to continue the studies on the histological differences between the infectious types and those that are caused by occlusal overload.

PMID: 14990883 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleEvidence-based dentistry in clinical practice.

Evidence-based dentistry in clinical practice.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2004 Jan;135(1):78-83

Authors: Ismail AI, Bader JD, ,

BACKGROUND: Evidence-based dentistry, or EBD, is not a new concept for the dental profession in the United States. The American Dental Association has long relied on credible scientific evidence in setting policy and communicating with dentists and the general public. EBD provides an approach to oral health care that follows a process of systematically collecting and analyzing scientific evidence to answer a specific clinical question. OVERVIEW: The authors discuss applications of systematic review findings to everyday clinical practice and explore the implications of EBD for dental education, clinical research and the provision of care to patients. CONCLUSIONS AND PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: In developing appropriate treatment plans, dentists should combine the patient's treatment needs and preferences with the best available scientific evidence, in conjunction with the dentist's clinical expertise. To keep pace with other health professions in building a strong evidence-based foundation, dentistry will require significant investments in clinical research and education to evaluate the best currently available evidence in dentistry and to identify new information needed to help dentists provide optimal care to patients.

PMID: 14959878 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleImmediate and 24-hour bond strengths of two dental adhesive systems to three ...
Related Articles

Immediate and 24-hour bond strengths of two dental adhesive systems to three tooth substrates.

J Contemp Dent Pract. 2003 Nov 15;4(4):28-39

Authors: Talic YF

Bond strengths of bonded composite resins to tooth substrates vary depending on when they were measured. Most bond strengths reported in the literature are a result of one hour, 24-hour, or longer periods of time that do not simulate actual clinical practice when occlusal adjustment and finishing and polishing procedures are performed within seconds after restoration placement. There are many different ways to measure the bond strength of direct esthetic restorations to various dental substrates. This research uses a method published previously that compares immediate and 24-hour bond strengths of a single-bottle dental adhesive and a self-etching primer adhesive to prepared enamel, unprepared enamel, and prepared dentin substrates. Significant differences were found between immediate and 24-hour bond strengths, but there were essentially no differences between substrates or adhesives.

PMID: 14625593 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleEnsuring retention for crowns and fixed prostheses.
Related Articles

Ensuring retention for crowns and fixed prostheses.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2003 Jul;134(7):993-5

Authors: Christensen GJ

Crowns and fixed prostheses are well-proven, accepted and routinely used restorations. However, they occasionally come loose from tooth preparations. Many things can cause these failures. In this article, I have discussed the following reasons for lack of adequate retention of crowns and fixed prostheses: inadequate tooth preparation; too much trust in dentin bonding agents and lack of adequate tooth buildup; tooth preparations that lack irregularities; improper selection of cements; and lack of postoperative occlusal adjustment.

PMID: 12892452 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleAiling and failing endosseous dental implants: a literature review.
Related Articles

Ailing and failing endosseous dental implants: a literature review.

J Contemp Dent Pract. 2003 May 15;4(2):35-50

Authors: Ashley ET, Covington LL, Bishop BG, Breault LG

Although the overall success rate of implant dentistry is very high, dental implants occasionally fail. It is essential for the clinician to recognize unhealthy implants and to determine whether they are ailing, failing, or failed prior to beginning any salvage efforts. Ailing and failing implants are amenable to therapy. Implants diagnosed as failed should be removed. This review provides the reader with information on non-surgical and surgical therapies available for managing ailing and failing implants. Undoubtedly, the best steps to avoid encountering ailing or failing implants involve proper case selection, excellent surgical technique, placing an adequate restoration on the implant, educating the implant patient to maintain meticulous oral hygiene, and evaluating the implant both clinically and radiographically at frequent recall visits.

PMID: 12761588 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleOcclusal interferences in orthodontic patients before and after treatment, an...
Related Articles

Occlusal interferences in orthodontic patients before and after treatment, and in subjects with minor orthodontic treatment need.

Eur J Orthod. 2002 Dec;24(6):677-87

Authors: Olsson M, Lindqvist B

Different opinions have been expressed concerning the effect of orthodontic treatment on mandibular function. One factor discussed is occlusal interferences. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of occlusal interferences in 210 orthodontic patients before (mean age 12 years 8 months) and after (mean age 16 years 10 months) treatment and to compare them with subjects with minor orthodontic treatment need. The results showed a decrease in retruded contact position/intercuspal position (RCP/ICP) interferences in all morphological deviations, age, and gender groups. The prevalence of mediotrusion interferences decreased in some types of malocclusions whilst in others there was no change. One reason for this is that treatment was started when the majority of the patients had no second or third molars erupted. At the final registration, the second molars were erupted in all patients, and the third molars were erupted in approximately 25 per cent. Mediotrusion interferences were more consistent with basal morphological deviations, for example, Class III relationships and anterior open bite were more consistent in the same person, and more difficult to eliminate than RCP/ICP interferences. RCP/ICP interferences, often caused by dental deviation in position, size, and shape, were easier to correct. Optimal orthodontic treatment, if necessary, including selective grinding, will decrease the prevalence of occlusal interferences.

PMID: 12512785 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleA review of the clinical management of mobile teeth.
Related Articles

A review of the clinical management of mobile teeth.

J Contemp Dent Pract. 2002 Nov 15;3(4):10-22

Authors: Bernal G, Carvajal JC, Mu&#xF1;oz-Viveros CA

The clinical management of mobile teeth can be a perplexing problem, especially if the underlying causes for that mobility have not been properly diagnosed. In some cases, mobile teeth are retained because patients decline multidisciplinary treatment that might otherwise include strategic extractions. This article discusses the relationship between occlusion and tooth mobility with an emphasis on identifying differences between increased mobility and increasing mobility. The indications, contraindications, and basic principles of tooth splinting are also reviewed. Provisional and definitive splints are defined and described with their respective occlusal considerations. Some mobile teeth can be treated through occlusal equilibration alone (primary occlusal trauma). Whereas mobile teeth with a compromised periodontium can be stabilized with the aid of provisional and/or definitive splinting (secondary occlusal trauma). It is important to consider splint therapy, because it may not only improve the prognosis of teeth, but may actually enhance the stability of the final prosthodontic treatment. The ultimate goal of successful management of mobile teeth is to restore function and comfort by establishing a stable occlusion that promotes tooth retention and the maintenance of periodontal health.

PMID: 12444399 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleOcclusion and temporomandibular disorders (TMD): still unsolved question?
Related Articles

Occlusion and temporomandibular disorders (TMD): still unsolved question?

J Dent Res. 2002 Nov;81(11):732

Authors: Greene CS

PMID: 12407084 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleExamining the prevalence and characteristics of abfractionlike cervical lesio...
Related Articles

Examining the prevalence and characteristics of abfractionlike cervical lesions in a population of U.S. veterans.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2001 Dec;132(12):1694-701; quiz 1726-7

Authors: Piotrowski BT, Gillette WB, Hancock EB

BACKGROUND: Abfraction is believed to be caused by biomechanical loading forces. It may be due to flexure and ultimate fatigue of tooth tissues that occur away from the point of occlusal loading. Other possible causes of cervical lesions include toothbrush abrasion and erosion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics and prevalence of abfraction-like lesions in a population of U.S. veterans. METHODS: The authors evaluated 103 teeth with noncarious cervical lesions in 32 subjects and characterized them based on the surface on which the lesion was located, history of toothbrush abrasion, size of the lesion, presence of plaque, surface texture, and presence and size of occlusal wear facets. RESULTS: Clinical examination revealed that adjacent control teeth had a significantly lower percentage of surfaces with plaque than did teeth with cervical lesions. Control teeth also had significantly less gingival recession than did affected teeth. Seventy-five percent of subjects reported a history of using a firm toothbrush, and 78.1 percent reported using a brushing technique that is known to cause toothbrush abrasion in the affected area. Affected teeth had neither significantly different occlusal wear facets nor occlusal contacts than control teeth. No significant correlations were found between cervical lesion dimensions and facet area. CONCLUSIONS: Toothbrush abrasion is strongly suspected as contributing to the formation of the majority of wedge-shaped lesions in this group of subjects. A small subset of lesions is thought to have resulted from some other phenomenon. Although the presence or contribution of occlusal stresses in the direct formation of these lesions could not be measured directly, the possibility of abfraction could not be eliminated. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Because the existence of abfraction could not be ruled out in about 15 percent of the cases, teeth with noncarious, wedge-shaped lesions warrant careful occlusal evaluation, with the possible need for occlusal adjustment or bitesplint therapy to treat bruxism.

PMID: 11780988 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleOcclusal considerations in periodontics.
Related Articles

Occlusal considerations in periodontics.

Br Dent J. 2001 Dec 8;191(11):597-604

Authors: Davies SJ, Gray RJ, Linden GJ, James JA

Periodontal disease does not directly affect the occluding surfaces of teeth, consequently some may find a section on periodontics a surprising inclusion. Trauma from the occlusion, however, has been linked with periodontal disease for many years. Karolyi published his pioneering paper, in 1901 'Beobachtungen uber Pyorrhoea alveolaris' (occlusal stress and 'alveolar pyorrhoea'). (1) However, despite extensive research over many decades, the role of occlusion in the aetiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontitis is still not completely understood.

PMID: 11770945 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleGood occlusal practice in advanced restorative dentistry.
Related Articles

Good occlusal practice in advanced restorative dentistry.

Br Dent J. 2001 Oct 27;191(8):421-4, 427-30, 433-4

Authors: Davies SJ, Gray RM, Whitehead SA

In most patients the existing occlusal scheme will be functional, comfortable and cosmetic; and so if a tooth or teeth need to be restored, the most appropriate way to provide the restoration(s) would be to adopt a 'conformative' approach: that is to provide treatment within the existing envelope of static and dynamic occlusal relationships. There will, however, be situations where the conformative approach cannot be adopted, and this section aims to describe what is 'Good Occlusal Practice' in these circumstances.

PMID: 11720016 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleGood occlusal practice in simple restorative dentistry.
Related Articles

Good occlusal practice in simple restorative dentistry.

Br Dent J. 2001 Oct 13;191(7):365-368, 371-4, 377-81

Authors: Davies SJ, Gray RM, Smith PW

Many theories and philosophies of occlusion have been developed. 1-12 The difficulty in scientifically validating the various approaches to providing an occlusion is that an 'occlusion' can only be judged against the reaction it may or may not produce in a tissue system (eg dental, alveolar, periodontal or articulatory). Because of this, the various theories and philosophies are essentially untested and so lack the scientific validity necessary to make them 'rules'. Often authors will present their own firmly held opinions as 'rules'. This does not mean that these approaches are to be ignored; they are, after all, the distillation of the clinical experience of many different operators over many years. But they are empirical. In developing these guidelines the authors have unashamedly drawn on this body of perceived wisdom, but we would also like to involve and challenge the reader by asking basic questions, and by applying a common sense approach to a subject that can be submerged under a sea of dictate and dogma.

PMID: 11697598 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleInitial prosthetic treatment.
Related Articles

Initial prosthetic treatment.

Br Dent J. 2001 Mar 10;190(5):235-44

Authors: Davenport JC, Basker RM, Heath JR, Ralph JP, Glantz PO, Hammond P

This article describes measures designed to provide short-term solutions to existing RPD problems and to establish an optimum oral environment for the provision of definitive prostheses.

PMID: 11303684 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleNow is the time to observe and treat dental occlusion.
Related Articles

Now is the time to observe and treat dental occlusion.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2001 Jan;132(1):100-2

Authors: Christensen GJ

PMID: 11194387 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleTemporomandibular disorders: moving from a dentally based to a medically base...
Related Articles

Temporomandibular disorders: moving from a dentally based to a medically based model.

J Dent Res. 2000 Oct;79(10):1736-9

Authors: Greene CS, Laskin DM

PMID: 11077987 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleTMD debate.
Related Articles

TMD debate.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2000 Aug;131(8):1110, 1113-4

Authors: Shulman J

PMID: 10953517 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticlePhased-in comprehensive care: a concept and case report.
Related Articles

Phased-in comprehensive care: a concept and case report.

J Am Dent Assoc. 1998 Jan;129(1):98-102

Authors: Appelbaum MB, Arvay JM

A complicated case often requires a multidisciplinary approach. But such an approach makes it difficult for the practitioner to offer the patient a definitive treatment plan. This article outlines the concept of a phased-in comprehensive treatment plan and reports on a case in which such a plan was used successfully.

PMID: 9448354 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleContribution of interdigitation to the occlusal development of the dentition ...
Related Articles

Contribution of interdigitation to the occlusal development of the dentition in Macaca fascicularis.

Eur J Orthod. 1997 Oct;19(5):531-42

Authors: Ostyn JM, Hons I, Maltha JC, van 't Hof MA, van der Linden FP

The contribution of interdigitation to the development of the dentition of juvenile Macaca fascicularis was studied on a series of dental casts and at the histological level by the use of vital staining. Fourteen laboratory-born monkeys were allocated to a control group (n = 7) or an experimental group (n = 7). They were followed from 31 to 152 weeks of age. In the animals of the experimental group, interdigitation was eliminated by gradually grinding the cusps of the molars and canines in both dental arches as soon as possible after emergence. Silicone impressions of the dental arches of each monkey were taken at regular intervals. Two experimental and two control animals received vital staining at regular intervals and were processed for histological evaluation at the end of the experimental period. Changes over time in the dimensions of the dentition were analysed. Locally, the maxillary dental arch in the experimental group broadened significantly faster than in the control group. No significant differences between the experimental and the control group were found for any of the mandibular parameters. The experimental intervention also led to less prevalence of anterior open bite in the experimental group than in the control group. It is concluded that interdigitation plays a role in the development of the maxillary dental arch and does not seem to affect mandibular dental arch development.

PMID: 9386339 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text Article[Analysis of 28 clinical cases and bone in stress around every tooth with per...
Related Articles

[Analysis of 28 clinical cases and bone in stress around every tooth with pericementitis caused by occlusal trauma]

Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue. 1994 Mar;3(1):18-21

Authors: Wang JD, Zhou SM

28 cases of pericementitis on occlusal trauma were observed,treated and followed up for 2 years;The bone in stress around every involved tooth was analysed according to the stress analysis by three demensinal photoelastic models loading excessive occlusal forces in various direction and coincided with the area of abnormality on the tooth radiograph.The result showed that the present methods of examination and treatment for tooth with traumatic pericementitis could diagnose exactly and cure effectively this disease;the rate of cure for 2 years was 86.7%,subtle occlusal adjustment by 3-4 appointments could maintain stable curative effect.It is suggested that clinicians should pay more attention to discover and treat both with traumatic pericementitis,the earliest clinical manifestation of both injury in occlusal trauma in order to protect them from severe injury in occlusal disharmony as well as periodontal trauma.

PMID: 15160172 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]


Free Full Text ArticleFinite element method simulation of bone resorption beneath a complete denture.
Related Articles

Finite element method simulation of bone resorption beneath a complete denture.

J Dent Res. 1989 Sep;68(9):1370-3

Authors: Maeda Y, Wood WW

Bone resorption beneath a maxillary complete denture was simulated by the finite element method, assuming that a threshold of compressive strain exists in the alveolar bone above which the resorption occurred. The pattern of predicted resorption was observed when 100 N of force was applied to three positions occlusally, and 20 N was applied facially. Moreover, we observed the effect of rebasing the denture after initial resorption. The results indicate that resorption was initiated on the facial and occlusal surfaces of the alveolar ridge and proceeded palatally. The resorption was greater as the occlusal load point moved facially and when the force was applied in the facial direction. When the load point was toward the facial, rebasing the denture accentuated the resorption, but when the load point was toward the palatal, the resorption was almost the same regardless of rebase. The pattern of simulated bone resorption was similar to that reported from clinical observations, which suggests that the resorption may be associated with compressive strains developed in the alveolar bone. The results argue for the importance of occlusal adjustment of dentures to move the occlusal load point palatally and produce balanced occlusion in protrusion and lateral excursions, especially after a rebase procedure.

PMID: 2778180 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Free Full Text ArticleRelations between occlusal interference and jaw muscle activities in response...
Related Articles

Relations between occlusal interference and jaw muscle activities in response to changes in head position.

J Dent Res. 1976 Jul-Aug;55(4):684-90

Authors: Funakoshi M, Fujita N, Takehana S

The jaw muscles responded to changes in the head position. Electromyographic responses to head positions were classified as either of two types--balanced and unbalanced. The balanced type of electromyographic responses of participants with normal occlusion changed to the unbalanced type after being set with an overlay to make a premature contact artificially, and returned to the balanced type after removal of the overlay. The unbalanced type of electromyographic response of participants with occlusal interference turned to the balanced type after occlusal adjustment.

PMID: 1064615 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



  Translate a Phrase or Word
  
  from

Adapted MeSH Browser © Dentalarticles.com | Disclaimer